Preloved for your littlies!

Preloved for your littlies!

Kids grow so fast and their interests change so quickly that, to keep up, parents are seeking more clothes and toys every few months. This adds up – taking up space and dollars. Fortunately, the trend to thrift has extended to children with a significant number (around 80%) of parents opting to supplement their children’s wardrobes and toy boxes with quality preloved clothing and toys, and up to 75% of parents getting on board to on-sell to help their and other’s pockets.

So, if you’re looking for items that need to last only a few months (like that briefly popular toy or game) you might get lucky at a thrift stall.

We’re excited to be offering, in addition to our usual preloved wearables for the grown-ups, 0-12 kid’s preloved clothing and small toys at our markets from December 2021. Our friend of the MyKids Market has hung up her shingles (her market will be sorely missed) and we’ve had so many enquiries that, with the MyKids Market blessing, we are now providing this opportunity locally in southern Tasmania.

Join with friends and bring along your baby and toddler wear, and small toys and items, like books, wooden, solid plastic and plush toys, small equipment like baby monitors and the such like. Just make sure, please, that all is clean, wiped down, not compromised with cracks or broken (or loose) bits, and are items you would confidently pass on to a friend.

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In for Spring 2021: the top eight thrifted trends

In for Spring 2021: the top eight thrifted trends

Thrifting is the perfect way to be creative, by breaking out of your style comfort zone and experimenting with different looks at any budget. If it doesn’t work out, pass it on down the preloved recycle line!

Sheer dresses, shirts, skirts and more dominated the Spring/Summer 2021 runways from fashion houses like Dior, Chanel and Valentino and has filtered down to brands that are in our price range too. It’s the perfect trend for spring because it allows you to layer while still staying cool in the warm weather. Spring is the time to let go of those winter layers and experiment with your style and creativity. Whether it be a new look or cut, fun colour or a quirky print, Spring is all about having fun with what you’re wearing.

Boyfriend shirts – A button-up white shirt is, has and always will be a wardrobe staple. However, this Spring the trend will be expanding to a more oversized boyfriend shirt look to spice things up. Think stripes and bright colours with a large fit that can be worn with pants or skirts or even styles as a dress.

Say hello to statement pants. We’re not talking your average mum jeans. It’s flare pants, loud prints and wide leg pants that are going to be a main mood for this season. Say goodbye to the status quo of jeans and a nice top and get inspired by pants with a difference. Pick out some thrifted styles that you won’t mind experimenting with.

Puffy sleeves are the feminine and elegant trend that’s demanding a spot in your wardrobe this season. Puffy sleeves will be present across dresses, crop tops, blouses and cardigans. Expect to see this style in an array of variety from structured fits to more flowing designs.

2000s fashion was a big prediction for 2021 fashion, and it has not disappointed. It’s time to dust off the velour tracksuit, grab the bedazzler and put on the fade sunglasses because the 2000s are back and better than ever. It also gives you the perfect excuse to go thrifting for some fabulous style inspo!

Chunky jewellery – A trend heavily influenced by the 2000s is chunky jewellery. Including rings, necklaces and bracelets – the more jewellery you can fit on the better. If it’s large, beaded or stoned then bonus points. Beaded and pearl necklaces are having a big moment in the spotlight as well as gemstone rings.

Coloured runners – The Australian runner community is showing no signs of slowing down. Big brands are a great place to start as they have a wide range of unique and limited-edition runners that all have a variation on the still popular bright white.

Cross-body bags – This trend will hit its crescendo this Spring/Summer season. They’re the staple bag for every day whether you’re doing the grocery shopping or heading out for some dinner and drinks. The perfect style bag to wear to a thrift market because it leaves you hands-free to rummage – just bring one big enough for all your lovely loot!

So, whether it’s puff sleeves, coloured runners, chunky accessories, statement pants, boyfriend shirts or the 2000s look, it’s the time to step out of your style comfort zone and have some fun this season!

Inspired by Alexandra Hourigan article.

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Are you onboard with the biggest 2020/2021 trends of vintage style and thrifting?

Are you onboard with the biggest 2020/2021 trends of vintage style and thrifting?

The biggest trends of 2020-2021 have been, and continue to be vintage fashion, reselling of clothes and thrifting. Whether or not you follow the fashion trends, Instagram posts and glossy mags, thrifting offers fun and wardrobe opportunity for any budget. Check it out, and get onboard!

Recent times have taken interest away from needing new clothes. Many fashion brands have had to halt production, and the pandemic has put off everyone’s appetites for frivolous fashion (temporarily, at least). Instead, the in-thing is keeping things simple and relaxed with loungewear and runners.

More and more people are reconsidering thrifted clothes. The stigma around them has slowly faded as more shoppers appreciate that it’s a sustainable option. You can wear preloved items without worrying about the environmental impact of clothing overproduction. And, really up there as an addictive thing, is the thrill of finding one-of-a-kinds that you can mix and match to create your own look and style.

Star power has also sparked a collective interest in preloved fashion. For example, the vintage Dior gown worn by Jennifer Aniston, the stealth vintage queen (!), to an awards event caused a 40% surge in searches for vintage dresses. And, to real royalty – when Princess Beatrice had at her royal wedding opted to wear a vintage gown from her grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, down the aisle there was a 297% (!) spike in searches for vintage wedding dresses.

Star power, the window of your local op or consignment shop, or a thrifted market stall – no matter which excites you, there’s definitely a place (and now’s the time) for seeking out style inspiration without spending lots, or wasting money experimenting – on something that looked great in the moment, in the dressing room, but in reality never gets worn – someone else’s experiment can be your new unique look!

Inspired by article from Lifestyle Asia

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Thrifting – An Art

Thrifting – An Art

Thrifting is an art. Whether it’s the search for summer sizzlers or winter warmers, it’s an activity that became popular amongst Gen Z (and now beyond) in the past few of years. Essentially, thrifting is buying gently loved clothing from at flea markets and such places at a discounted price. You should try it – often, you’ll find high-end and vintage clothing for much lower and affordable prices. In the past, the idea of buying second-hand clothing carried the taboo of uncleanliness and poverty. However, the rise of middle and upper-class consumers who have switched and begun thrifting, and have contributed their amazing no-longer-worn collections to the mix, has prompted this once unpleasantly-seen activity to become a widely-accepted and lucrative (for your wallet and wardrobe) trend.

No doubt, the idea of thrifting as a go-to option for clothes amongst the wider public was started by teens or members of Gen Z. Research shows that Gen Z consumers believe that companies have a responsibility to address environmental and social issues. In particular, clothing companies are targets of this, especially those considered fast fashion, which contribute largely to clothing waste and pollution. As a result, thrifting has become an eco-conscious method of shopping for clothes, while still being able to keep up with fashion trends (especially with the recent popularity of vintage fashion). Ultimately, the switch to thrift shopping can be attributed to wanting to make a difference in the fight against climate change and the increasing pressure to stay up-to-date with social media trends.

It is evident that gently loved clothing shopping is an ideal activity to help our environment. But it’s also important that thrifters who are thrifting as a privilege and not a necessity can do it consciously, in order to help the environment and not put anyone else at a disadvantage. Here are 3 main strategies to ensure you are thrifting consciously this chilly season:

  1. Don’t do huge hauls: shop mindfully and only purchase items that you know you will love to wear. Buying massive amounts of clothes undermines the real reason people thrift in the first place—to shop ethically and eliminate the cycle of disposable fashion.

  2. Choose your thrift venues wisely: look for vintage markets or thrift outlets in your local areas that are often there for the purpose of thrifting as a hobby and to help with your wardrobe overhaul bottom line.

  3. Only buy if finding the outfits makes you feel good (ethically) and adds to the ‘you’ you want to portray. Have a look through your wardrobe and determine where the gaps are – only buy to fill those gaps so you don’t find yourself with an overloaded wardrobe; having bought on a whim and after the shopping high fades, you realise you need to onsell (or heaven-forbid, dump); or overwhelmed. A well choreographed (or a capsule) wardrobe is surprisingly easy to manage on those busy mornings!

Extracted from an article by Asima Hudani (Oct 2020)

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Pop colour to pastels…let’s banish the blues!

Pop colour to pastels…let’s banish the blues!

This season let’s banish any remnants of the COVID19 unhappiness by adding some cheery (yet low cost) outfits to our lives!

Who doesn’t love a splash of colour, and after the year we’ve had we definitely need some brightness in our lives. It’s the season, and certainly the weather, to indulge brightly coloured crayon colours as perfect accessories to add to a summer black or white outfit and to really pop. A baby blue cardigan over a crisp white dress, or over a white cotton top matched with a 60’s a-line skirt is reminiscent of summers gone by. A Broderie anglaise black cotton summer dress is versatile as it can be office wear but goes on to fit the bill if you’re heading straight from your desk to drinks. Add a bright pairs of shoes for fun. A bright pink pair of heels or pumps and loud handbag with a black maxi dress really packs in a punch for your working day. Red is also a seasonal favourite, whether block colour lifted with a simple silver belt, or boho breezy styles dressed up or funky with cowboy boots and rustic leather accessories. The sky’s the limit!

If you prefer more subtle looks, create one of this season’s pastel styles by hunting down some key preloved pastel pieces, which are not only affordable but help support sustainable fashion. Pastels let you enjoy a romantic dreamy look. An outfit of pastel colours gives the sense of a camera slightly out of focus – picture yourself relaxed in the summer evening sun where everything looks glorious but has that faded quality about it. Match a baby blue or pale sage-coloured dress with a simple pair of white sandals for a fresh pastel look. Look for pale pink, blue or yellow skinny jeans and add a prairie-style billowy shirt for a very boho look.

Match summer linen to summer cotton which is beautifully cool and can be worn as a laid back, yet smart outfit while having you feel comfortable in the summer heat. To lengthen your leg add a pair of white or nude-coloured shoes to continue the illusion of never ending legs! It’s easy to underestimate a predominantly white outfit – it’s cool, crisp and smart. Accessories are your friend when you wear a one-colour palette. Add bright coloured handbags or belts, or for a seasonal impact, silver and gold accessories are brilliant (excuse the pun!).

Now that we’re lucky enough to be out and about and wearing ‘normal’ clothes, enjoy this season’s fill of styles without breaking the bank! The perfect way to create your new-to-you outfits but on a pre-Christmas and COVID19 budget is to look for preloved items. This supports the stallholders – they’re likely hoping for a few dollars to put towards their own outfits or summer outings –  it supports sustainability, small local, community business, and let’s you buy for less….what’s not to like!
Thanks to Jenna Haws 2020
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COVID and Preloved Clothing: The Facts

COVID and Preloved Clothing: The Facts

You’ll be relieved to hear that, to date, there have been no documented cases of transmission of COVID19 via clothing or shoes. Most household laundry detergents are sufficient to kill any traces of the virus when doing the washing. So, you won’t land in the soup!

Here’s what the publicly available information tells us about COVID and preloved clothing. Clothing is low risk. As an airborne virus, it is known that droplets, where evident, can land on all sorts of surfaces. And, depending on the surface, experts estimate that the virus can survive for a few hours to a few days. We all know that hard surfaces like metal and plastic can provide a haven for the virus for up to 2-3 days, but the good news is that clothing, which is more mesh-like, is not considered a material conducive to its survival.

What about shoes? By their very nature, shoes tend to be dirtier than clothing. In ordinary circumstances, shoes are more likely to carry bacteria and contaminants around. Nonetheless, experts agree that shoes are an unlikely source of transmission of the virus. What we do with our shoes is already protective…we already manage them as dirty objects and they aren’t high touch areas when being worn.

When shopping secondhand wearables it’s likely that the clothing – depending on where you shop – has been laundered and aired. Personalised marketplaces, where the owner of the clothing and shoe collection is right in front of you, can give you the opportunity to ask the questions you need about their collections to ensure you feel safe. You can take comfort in the knowledge that their pieces aren’t an unknown quantity. At these kinds of markets, experience tells us that stallholders generally take pride in displaying quality, clean and well-looked after pieces.

The bottom line. We all know that direct transmission from person to person is still believed to be the primary form of exposure, and there’s minimal chance of the virus surviving on clothing or shoes and being transmitted to others.

Sourced from articles by: Gigen Mammoser, April, 2020 and June, 2020 

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